Saturday Garden Inspiration – July 4, 2015

Sharing a little glimpse of my garden that makes me happy.

Wishing you a very peaceful day.

IMG_1704 (1280x853)

Once again this year, I’ll be sharing little glimpses of our gardens. Although so much is growing all the time, there is always a little moment every week that makes me smile extra wide and this is what I want to share with you.

Oh, peas, peas, glorious peas! Always such a happy time of year. The kids snap them right off the vine and snack on them in the sunshine. We’ve been growing this classic snow pea, or “mange-tout” meaning to eat all, (“Cascadia” / Pisum sativum var. saccharatum) for 4 years now and honestly, I don’t think we will ever look back. Beautiful white and lavender flowers, vines reaching as high as 4 ft, frost resistant and a cold climate heirloom that is good from beginning to end. The more you snap, the more grow back. They are super tasty when you let the peas grow out as well. We shell baskets full of these every year for freezing. You can sow them as early as the ground is workable up until late May or early June. Last year, we were still eating peas in September. What a treat!

I remember when we started growing our plants from seed, how excited we were for all the different varieties and possibilities out there. We would jam pack our community garden with as many “funky” heirlooms as we could. It was so much fun. But we weren’t serious about it then. As years went by, we started noticing that although it was fun to experiment, we couldn’t count on our crops. We started reducing the number of varieties we planted, started keeping track of what worked, what didn’t. We became food producers. It wasn’t just about the luxury of having a few homegrown tomatoes. It became about feeding our family, preserving, gaining knowledge and working towards results that would make us appreciate this life we chose.  And although we still reserve ourselves the right to seed a few “funky” cherry tomatoes here and there, I think we have finally reached a balance. It feels pretty good.

How is your garden growing?

Advertisements

About Yanic A.

Hello to all of you and thank you for stopping by! My name is Yanic. I'm a wife to a wonderful husband, a mother of 2 beautifully complex and unique children and a lover of all things inspiring. Having started a personal journey of self discovery when I found out I was pregnant with my daughter 4 years ago, I've since embraced a daily life of simpler pleasures and gratitude. As we get to know each other, you will know me as a quilter, a gardener, a Tao cultivator, a vegetarian foodie, a true believer in a healthy family life as being the secret to my happiness and hopefully as time goes on, a friend... I will try to share with you my days as they unfold, speaking of my happy successes without censoring my challenges, trying to make this blog a true portrait of the ever-changing path that I have chosen for myself. I'm hoping to find in these pages others to share with and learn from, bringing to light the absolute connection in all things and people, showing this world as being a true community.
This entry was posted in Gardening, Gratitude, Saturday garden inspiration and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Saturday Garden Inspiration – July 4, 2015

  1. Carie says:

    I haven’t tried peas yet but I think you might just have tempted me – they do look very yummy! I’ve always tried growing quite random things in the past and it’s probably rather telling that this year I’ve grown what I know we eat and this year we’ve got hooked!

    Like

  2. Next year I need to grow so many more peas! They hardly even make it into the house 😉 We’ve really been getting more practical the past two years, just sticking to staples, things I know will do well and we’ll eat a lot of. If we had a little more room I might go back to my adventurous days! But for the meantime, it’s all about practicality for us as well.

    Like

    • Yanic A. says:

      I totally understand. We will have to grow so many more next year as well. My daughter just keeps picking and eating… Like you had said in one of your previous posts : Measuring the growth of a family by how quickly the food disappears! 🙂

      Like

  3. Marie says:

    Oui, je vois bien la différence entre jardiner pour “expérimenter” et jardiner “pour se nourrir” et j’ai beaucoup d’admiration pour ceux qui jardinent “sérieusement”. Où nous sommes, nous pouvons cultiver toute l’année (kales, brocolis, poireaux, parsnips et même arugula – si nous le plantons “au bon moment”), vont être disponibles frais même l’hiver. Mais il faut beaucoup de temps pour acquérir l’expérience et les connaissances nécessaires. Et certaines années, nous réussissons mieux que d’autres. Je n’ai pas une très grande surface de culture non plus (deux veggie beds et quelques pots), mais avec le potentiel de jardiner toute l’année, ça peut déjà faire une différence dans la liste d’épicerie si on s’y prend bien!

    Pour les pois et les haricots, je pensais essayer en planter de nouveau en juillet pour récolter en septembre – octobre… J’ai déjà lu que c’était possible. Est-ce que tu as déjà expérimenté?

    Like

    • Yanic A. says:

      L’an passé, nous avons replanté des fèves fin juillet en pensant en avoir por septembre. Nous avions beaucoup de plants et de fleurs mais le froid est arrivé trop vite et les insectes sont devenus rares. Cette année, je vais replanter mi-juillet pour voir. Pour les pois, je n,ai jamais essayé… Je pense que je ferai un peu de recherche! 🙂 Avoir des petits pois vrais en septembre, quel luxe! 🙂

      Nous voulons devenir plus habile a prolongé notre saison de croissance. Nous voulons investir pour bâtir des tunnel par dessus certains de nos jardins. Mais cela devra peut-être attendre l’an prochain.

      Like

      • Marie says:

        Moi aussi j’aimerais bien installer des “cold frames” pour nous permettre de planter des variétés de légumes plus tôt dans la saison. Peut être d’ici un an ou deux?

        Concernant les pois, j’ai aussi découvert l’an passé que les feuilles peuvent se manger en salade ou dans les sandwiches! Tu le savais peut être déjà, mais pour moi ça été toute une découverte! Le goût est délicieux, comme celui des petits pois frais en fait. C’est juste la texture qui est différente. Du coup, on profite encore plus du potager!

        Like

      • Yanic A. says:

        Je ne le savais pas du tout, merci! Quand on les récolte?

        Like

  4. kittywilkin says:

    I’m going to have to try that variety!!! I sadly let go of my garden this year. With Finn born the first days of June, I knew that it would be impossible for me to keep up with the weeding and maintenance, so I just let go. We have kale and a few survivor storage onions (there were many more than a few, but a few days early on without watering eliminated all but the strongest). I have aspirations to get some carrots planted, but the weeds have taken over the bed, so much needs to be done before that can happen. We’ll see. There’s always next year 🙂

    Like

    • Yanic A. says:

      Yes there is and what you could do this year if weeds are an issue is to build yourself a huge barrier and kill them off! Take advantage of the fact that you didn’t plant anything : Thick layer of cardboard or heavy sections of newspaper for now, snuff them out. Then in fall, a fresh layer of dirt and heavy mulching with shredded leaves. You could even plant a cover crop in early fall like mustard or fall rye and just let the nitrogen sink on down. Turn everything in November and cover with leaves. By next year, you’ll have an amazing garden ready for planting and very little weeds to worry about. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Marie says:

    Au sujet des feuilles de pois, j’en récolte simplement de temps en temps selon nos besoins, un peu partout sur mes plants. Je prends surtout les feuilles plus petites qui sont plus tendres. De cette façon, je ne “traumatise” pas mes plants en prenant trop de feuilles au même endroit et nous avons quand même plein de petits pois! Si non, il est aussi possible de faire pousser les plants essentiellement pour les “shoot and tendrils”. Tu peux trouver des infos notamment sur ce site: http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetables/qt/Pea-Shoots-Tendrils.htm

    Like

    • Yanic A. says:

      Merci pour l’info… j’ai déjà fait germiner des pois, mais jamais plus gros que 3-5 cm. J’ai bien hâte d’essayer!

      Like

      • Marie says:

        Je n’ai jamais essayé de faire germer les pois, alors je ne sais pas si ça fonctionne bien. Mais je me rends compte que je n’ai pas directement répondu à ta question! Je commence à cueillir les feuilles quand mes plants sont assez gros et ont déjà des fleurs. Mais je pense que de commencer un peu plus tôt, ça devrait marcher aussi. En refaisant des recherches, j’ai trouvé que les fleurs se mangent également. Ça fait très joli dans les salades! (La variété de pois que je cultive, ce sont les “Dwarf Grey Sugar”). Je ne sais pourquoi ils les appellent “dwarf” cependant, car ils deviennent très gros!

        Like

      • Yanic A. says:

        Les pousses de pois, c’est très bon, mais long à germiner et facile à perdre. Je trouve que les pousses, si oublié même seulment 6 heures de trop deviennent sûres très rapidement. Mais j’ai bien hâte de goutter les feuilles de pois. Je pense que j’en mettrai dans ma salade ce soir. 🙂

        Like

I would love to hear from you so please, take a minute and say hello!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s